Art


Abrasion Holography by James Minden The Museum of Arts and Sciences is pleased to present Black & Light, an exhibition that gives each viewer a unique experience because no two people see the same thing at the same time.

Black & Light, on display now through November 2, 2014, features groundbreaking abrasion holograms—by artist James Minden—that appear to be three-dimensional. As a viewer moves around each piece of art, the item changes its appearance.

Not only is the viewer’s experience unique, the painter and printmaker admits that he hasn’t found many other artists experimenting with this new art medium.

Because of the interactive nature of Black & Light, there is no doubt that this exhibition must be seen in person to be believed.

How to View this Work

Relax your eyes so that you see a three-dimensional image of the shapes projecting into the gallery space.

The shapes appear to move because each of your eyes sees it from a different angle—in fact, each of your eyes sees a different reflection.

Because your two eyes see different patterns, your brain can combine the two images together and make a three-dimensional structure in your mind.

The two images are called a “stereo pair.”

The stereoscopic image is the result of light reflecting from Minden’s geometric pattern, which includes thousands of hand-incised scratches.
Click here to read the Artist’s Statement.
The Art & Science of James Minden’s Abrasion Holography

Minden refers to his work as light drawings because the surface is literally drawn or incised by hand. Using a compass, the artist scratches narrow radius-shaped grooves in a sheet of plastic that has been coated with a diluted matte medium. When light is reflected from the surface and grooves, the image appears to be three-dimensional.

Painstakingly hand-incised, through a process known as abrasion holography, Minden’s light drawings are intricate geometric patterns made on plastic. Using a custom-made compass, Minden scratches narrow radius-shaped grooves in a sheet of plastic that has been coated with a diluted matte medium. This coating prevents the surface from reflecting light except where the grooves have been created. Once his pattern is completed, Minden paints the back of the plastic with black acrylic paint and then adheres the plastic to a birch wood panel for support. Abrasion holography, also called “chatoyant” holography, employs the same physics as white-light or “rainbow” holograms.

If visible, click on the “i” in the upper right corner to read the current photo’s caption.
About James Minden

James Minden was born in Portland, Oregon. He attended Portland State University where he studied social science and art, eventually deciding to concentrate on painting. He graduated with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Art in 1977 and has since exhibited his art professionally. Minden lived and worked in New York City in the 1980’s but returned to Portland in 1991.

After concentrating on painting, drawing and printmaking for his entire career, in 2011 he began to exhibit his light drawings, handmade abrasion holograms, which he has focused on ever since. Minden’s artworks are included in many collections, private and corporate.
Black & Light is on display at the Museum of Arts and Sciences through November 2, 2014



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